Our Faculty

Chelsea Sharon

Research Areas
Assistant Professor Sharon is an observational radio astronomer and she studies the processes that affect star formation and galaxy evolution across cosmic time. For her work, she primarily uses synchronised arrays of radio telescopes like the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array in New Mexico (USA) and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array in Chile to characterise the gas reservoirs that fuel star formation. Her work addresses why galaxies in the early universe (~10 billion years ago) have unusually high star formation rates, and what role galaxies’ central supermassive black holes play in ending starbursts. Dr. Sharon received her BS in
astrophysics at the California Institute of Technology and her PhD in physics at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Prior to arriving at Yale-NUS College, she was a postdoctoral research associate at Cornell University and the William & Caroline Herschel Postdoctoral Fellow at McMaster University.
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Teaching Subjects

General Physics: Electronics and Nonlinear Dynamics

Aleksandr Rodin

Research Areas
Assistant Professor Rodin was born in Ukraine and moved to the United States at the age of 14. He attended the University of Southern California between 2003 and 2007, graduating with a BS in Physics. Following this, he obtained his PhD in Physics in 2012 from the University of California, San Diego. This led him to a two-year postdoctoral position with Boston University. He moved to Singapore in 2014 where he joined the Graphene Research Centre. There, he worked both on characterising new two-dimensional materials, as well as looking for their potential applications. Focusing on 2D materials, Dr Rodin is primarily interested in their electronic properties. In particular, he studies unusual effects that arise from the non-traditional band structures in two dimensions, such as anisotropic excitations and valley polarisation. He is also involved in studying many-body physics in the context of impurity-substrate interactions.
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Teaching Subjects

Introduction to Electrodynamics

Stanislav Presolski

Research Areas
Assistant Professor Presolski has been on the move ever since leaving Bulgaria to attend the United World College of the Adriatic in Italy. After obtaining a BA in Physics and Chemistry from Colby (a small liberal arts college in Maine, USA), a PhD from The Scripps Research Institute in California and working in the Netherlands he has found in Yale-NUS a place that he calls home. Not only for its tolerant, multicultural and otherwise brilliant community, but also for its ambition to redefine the academic status quo in Singapore and enhance liberal arts education the world over. He intends to harness his synthetic and physical-organic chemistry experience in leading a research group of undergraduates, who will design, prepare and deploy operationally simple, photo-switchable catalytic molecules.
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Teaching Subjects

Scientific Inquiry 2 – Measurements and Data Analysis
Foundations of Science – Molecular Perspectives
Instrumental Analysis with Lab
Organic Chemistry with Lab

Ben Olsen

Research Areas
Assistant Professor Olsen earned a BSc degree in physics at the California Institute of Technology in 2006, and a PhD in physics at Princeton University in 2011. He then studied phase separation in mixed-dimensional Fermi gases in the ultracold atoms group at Rice University in the Department of Physics & Astronomy and Rice Quantum Institute. After spending a year in the industry developing atom-interferometry based inertial sensors, he joined the ultracold atoms group at the University of Toronto to study out-of-equilibrium dynamics of Fermi gases. At Yale-NUS College, Dr Olsen will build a lab to engineer exotic quantum phases using gases of ultracold atomic lithium and to probe their dynamical behaviour. This research will study the properties of many-body correlated phases both in and out of equilibrium to help pave the way toward advanced quantum technologies including quantum information and advanced sensing.
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Teaching Subjects

Scientific Inquiry 2

Hui Khoon Ng

Research Areas
Assistant Professor Ng studies quantum systems for the purpose of quantum information processing. Her research interests centre around the question of noise and its effects on quantum information and quantum computation. Given the fragile nature of quantum phenomena, noise is the main stumbling block in any attempt at accessing and controlling quantum systems. She has worked on various aspects of quantum error correction and fault tolerance for noise control. Her recent focus is on the issue of non-Markovian noise: how it arises in quantum systems, how to characterise it, and its impact on quantum computational tasks. Since joining the Centre for Quantum Technologies (CQT), she has also been working on quantum tomography – the estimation of the state of quantum systems and the characterisation of quantum processes. Quantum tomography is a primitive that underlies nearly all quantum tasks. In particular, Dr Ng likes to think about techniques that offer significant improvements when only a small amount of data is available, an often-encountered situation in quantum experiments.
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Teaching Subjects

Scientific Inquiry 2
Classical Mechanics

Chan Kiat Hwa

Research Areas
Assistant Professor Chan is interested in exploring and developing bioorganometallic compounds for the modulation of cellular processes in select diseases. Carbon monoxide and nitric oxide are known regulators of many cellular processes, so bioorganometallic compounds containing these molecules could modulate cellular responses during disease. However, the detoxification enzymes of the liver can potentially destroy these bioorganometallic compounds. Thus, it is essential to understand the action of liver enzymes on these compounds so that effective bioorganometallic therapeutics can be developed. Dr Chan is also interested in studying the gelation, as well as molecular self-assembly, of select organometallic compounds. Of particular interest is how various factors, e.g. structural geometry and hydrogen bonding, affect molecular self-assembly and gelation. Such factors can be easily varied in organometallic compounds, thus allowing the curious yet ubiquitous phenomenon of gelation to be studied systematically.
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Teaching Subjects

Scientific Inquiry 2 – Measurements and Data Analysis
Foundations of Science – Water
Inorganic Chemistry with Lab
Organometallic Chemistry
Physical Chemistry

Andrew Bettiol

Research Areas
Associate Professor Bettiol works in the areas of optics and photonics, more specifically ion beam modification of materials for applications in micro/nanophotonics, terhertz spectroscopy and optics, metamaterials, active plasmonics, loss mitigation in micro-optical systems, enhancement of light emission using plasmonics, mid-IR optics, passive and active devices for biosensing, and integrated optics for microfluidic applications. His studies in the field of nuclear microscopy and radiobiology include proton induced fluorescence microscopy in biological systems, super-resolution imaging, radiation effects in single live cells, applications in cancer treatment using particle therapy, development of diamond based radiation hard particle detectors, delta-E detectors using thin membranes, and radiation dosimetry.
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Teaching Subjects

Foundations of Science
Optics

Steven Lynn Bernasek

Research Areas
Professor Bernasek is an experimental physical chemist, interested in the mechanisms and dynamics of chemical reactions which occur at solid surfaces and interfaces. His research interests include studies of the mechanisms of heterogeneous catalysis, the mechanism and prevention of corrosion of active metals, and the chemistry of processing of electronic device materials. His recent work has focused on the understanding of surface self-assembly processes and the surface chemistry necessary for the development of molecular electronic devices. He is also very interested in the role of surfaces in the process of molecular evolution, particularly the question of homochirality in biologically active molecules.
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Teaching Subjects

Molecular Structure and Reactivity

Shaffique Adam

Research Areas
Associate Professor Adam was born in Nairobi, Kenya. After completing his A-levels in Kenya, he went to Stanford University where he received his BS, majoring in Physics with a minor in Mathematics. He graduated with departmental honours and a University distinction. After spending four months as an exchange student at Magdalen College in Oxford University, Dr Adam went on to pursue his doctorate in Theoretical Physics at Cornell University, where he worked on the magnetic properties of nanoscale conductors. He then moved to the Condensed Matter Theory Center at the University of Maryland where he worked on the electronic transport properties of graphene. Before joining Yale-NUS College, Dr Adam spent three years as a National Research Council Fellow in the Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology at the United States National Institute of Standards and Technology.
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Teaching Subjects

Electronics and Non-linear Dynamics
Introduction to Quantum Mechanics
Integrated Science 1 and 2